Britain trades free speech for security

by Michael Johnson Michael Johnson worked as a reporter and editor in New York, Moscow, Paris and London over his journalism career. He is now based in Bordeaux, France, where he writes for the International Herald-Tribune and other publications. He covered European technology for Business Week for five years, and served nine years as chief editor of International Management magazine. In 1990 he was appointed chief editor of the French technology weekly 01 Informatique where he worked as Editorial Director for two years. He also spent four years as Moscow correspondent of The Associated Press. He is the author of four books and recently edited “24/7 Innovation” for an Accenture consultant and “Nokia: The Inside Story”, written by historian Martti Haikio, for the Nokia Corporation. A fluent French speaker, he also speaks Russian. 23.02.2009

Wilders was denied entry because he was considered a public danger. Allowing him into the country would "threaten community harmony and therefore public safety in the UK," said a letter to Wilders from the British Home Office. Indeed, a Muslim member of Parliament did threaten to mobilize 10,000 faithful to besiege Parliament if Wilders were allowed in to host a showing of his 17-minute video "Fitna".

On orders from Home Secretary Jacqui Smith, Wilders was detained briefly at London's Heathrow Airport and sent home. He was attempting to enter Britain to accept an invitation from a group in the House of Lords to screen "Fitna", a scorching indictment of radical Islam. ("Fitna" is an Arabic term meaning "disagreement and division among people" or a "test of faith in times of trial".)

The Dutch are also attempting to silence Wilders in his own country, launching criminal proceedings against him for "inciting hatred and discrimination" and "insulting Muslim worshippers" through his public statements and the same film that sparked his British ban. The Dutch have been debating the prospect of a "Muslim tsunami" in their country for the past few years, although studies disagree on the possibility of Muslims tipping the balance against the traditional Christian culture.

The video, which has been available for free viewing on several internet sites for nearly a year, juxtaposes aggressive citations from the Koran with videos of recent Islamic extremist atrocities and incitements from the pulpit to crush infidels. Inevitably, the net effect is to paint all of Islam with the radical brush.

Part 1 can be viewed at: http://youtube.com/watch?v=5kcev1K-NOc

Part 2 can be viewed at: http://youtube.com/watch?v=TdLMFs4fv4E

The implications of the incident at Heathrow are broader than the suppression of a single film, however. Europe is feeling pressure from the worldwide Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), which seeks to stamp out Islamophobia and blasphemy against Islam, trends that it believes Wilders encourages.

Islamophobia, as defined by the OIC, encompasses
European immigration controls, anti-terrorist measures, and, in the case of the Netherlands, efforts to defend its culture and national identity.

Wilders has already shown his film to Denmark's parliament and intends to take it to Italy and the U.S. House of Representatives in the coming weeks.

The Heathrow incident seems to have rattled the UK government, which apparently felt the immediate need to calm Muslim sensitivities whatever the backlash from non-Muslims. It may be a muddle, but it is far from a renunciation of basic freedoms. A number of high-profile cases protecting free speech have preceded the Wilders case, including the support of Salman Rushdie against a worldwide fatwa for his novel "Satanic Verses", and the arrest and expulsion of radical clerics who preached violence and intolerance.

The Wilders case raises memories of Voltaire's celebrated remark that he might disagree with something a person says, but he defends his right to say it. In other words, Western culture mandates that Wilders' views - and his video -- deserve an airing, with judgment left to free-thinking viewers.


See also related article by Tawfik Hamil: "Islam Should Prove It is a of Peace"


Please watch Geert Wilders being interviewed by BBC's Stephen Sackur:

Part 1:


Part 2:




Part 3:




If you wish to comment on this article, you can do so on-line.

Should you wish to publish your own article on the Facts & Arts website, please contact us at .

This article is brought to you by the author who owns the copyright to the text.

Should you want to support the author’s creative work you can use the PayPal “Donate” button below.

Your donation is a transaction between you and the author. The proceeds go directly to the author’s PayPal account in full less PayPal’s commission.

Facts & Arts neither receives information about you, nor of your donation, nor does Facts & Arts receive a commission.

Facts & Arts does not pay the author, nor takes paid by the author, for the posting of the author's material on Facts & Arts. Facts & Arts finances its operations by selling advertising space.

Rate this article

Click the stars to rate

Recent articles

Archive