Fashion Show Elle Magazine Didn’t Want You to See

by Iain Levine Iain Levine program director at Human Rights Watch, oversees the organization's research and reporting work. He has particular expertise in humanitarian crises, protection of civilians in conflict, and children's rights. Levine's field experience includes more than 10 years in Sudan and Mozambique working on humanitarian programs with particular emphasis on protection of children and other civilians. He has also worked as Amnesty International's representative at the United Nations and UNICEF's chief of humanitarian policy and advocacy. Levine, a graduate of Hull University and the London School of Economics, speaks Portuguese 20.11.2013

What were they thinking? 

Someone, somewhere in the depths of luxury magazine Elle thought it was a good idea to feature “North Korea chic” in September’s edition of the magazine (the page was subsequently replaced). 

“Some iteration of the military trend stomps the runways every few seasons,” the article purred. “This time, it's edgier, even dangerous, with sharp buckles and clasps and take-no-prisoners tailoring.” Dangerous indeed for those actually in North Korea and subject to being executed for simply watching a foreign video. Or for those beaten to death. 

It didn't take long for the world to render its judgement – outrage on social media condemned Elle for its breathtaking ignorance and insensitivity.

Originally posted on Human Rights Watch web site, posted here with their kind permission. For Human Rights Watch web site, please click here.

A National Book Award finalist and National Book Critics Circle finalist, Barbara Demick’s Nothing to Envy is a remarkable view into North Korea, as seen through the lives of six ordinary citizens
Award-winning journalist Barbara Demick follows the lives of six North Korean citizens over fifteen years—a chaotic period that saw the death of Kim Il-sung, the rise to power of his son Kim Jong-il, and a devastating famine that killed one-fifth of the population. Demick brings to life what it means to be living under the most repressive totalitarian regime today—an Orwellian world that is by choice not connected to the Internet, where displays of affection are punished, informants are rewarded, and an offhand remark can send a person to the gulag for life. Demick takes us deep inside the country, beyond the reach of government censors, and through meticulous and sensitive reporting we see her subjects fall in love, raise families, nurture ambitions, and struggle for survival. One by one, we witness their profound, life-altering disillusionment with the government and their realization that, rather than providing them with lives of abundance, their country has betrayed them.

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